Tech, Drugs and Homework

A blog about life, anthropology, transhumanism, the brain, singularity, the future and the elegancy of the universe.

Connie Cancer (Roseanne Barr) and Kurt Cannabis (Malcolm McDowell) discuss cannabis as a cancer cure in this cute and funny video.  Recent studies have suggested that cannabis can be applied as cure for cancer and many other human ailments.  If you could take a natural medicine with few negative side effects to cure a large fraction of common ailments, would you? 

thenextweb:

Twitter also outlines some figures in an infographic that put the number of messages sent over Twitter into perspective. For instance, every day the world sends the equivalent of a 10 million-page book’s worth of Tweets. That could also be translated as 8z163 copies of Tolstoy’s War and Peace, enough to create a stack the size of Taiwan’s TaiPei 101, the second tallest building in the world at 1,470 feet. If you read all of the text in every Tweet sent in a single day, it would take you 31 years. (via Huge: Twitter now handles 200 Million tweets a day, enough to write a 10 million-page book - Twitter)

thenextweb:

Twitter also outlines some figures in an infographic that put the number of messages sent over Twitter into perspective. For instance, every day the world sends the equivalent of a 10 million-page book’s worth of Tweets. That could also be translated as 8z163 copies of Tolstoy’s War and Peace, enough to create a stack the size of Taiwan’s TaiPei 101, the second tallest building in the world at 1,470 feet. If you read all of the text in every Tweet sent in a single day, it would take you 31 years. (via Huge: Twitter now handles 200 Million tweets a day, enough to write a 10 million-page book - Twitter)

theanthrolibrarian:

TED video from 2008.

“Louise Leakey asks, ‘Who are we?’ The question takes her to the Rift Valley in Eastern Africa, where she digs for the evolutionary origins of humankind — and suggests a stunning new vision of our competing ancestors.”

8bitfuture:

Biobolt reads your mind, transmits signals over your skin.
A new type of brain-computer interface allows information from the brain to be transmitted over the skin, using a “Body Area Network” (BAN).
The brain implant (pictured) is used to read specific signals - leg movements, for example - and then transmit the information over the skin to a receiver elsewhere in the body. If the receiver was then implanted in the leg muscles it could allow a disabled person to move their legs, with the signals not needing to pass down the spinal column.
The implant does not require open-skull surgery, but is implanted under the skin to avoid infection. Having the signals transmit through the skin is a big step up from current generation devices which require external wires, which usually restrict users to sitting in a wheelchair.

8bitfuture:

Biobolt reads your mind, transmits signals over your skin.

A new type of brain-computer interface allows information from the brain to be transmitted over the skin, using a “Body Area Network” (BAN).

The brain implant (pictured) is used to read specific signals - leg movements, for example - and then transmit the information over the skin to a receiver elsewhere in the body. If the receiver was then implanted in the leg muscles it could allow a disabled person to move their legs, with the signals not needing to pass down the spinal column.

The implant does not require open-skull surgery, but is implanted under the skin to avoid infection. Having the signals transmit through the skin is a big step up from current generation devices which require external wires, which usually restrict users to sitting in a wheelchair.